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George A. Sawatzky

George A. Sawatzky

Program
Quantum Materials

Appointment
Senior Fellow

Institution
University of British Columbia

Country
Canada Canada


George Sawatzky is a Professor of Physics and Chemistry at the University of British Columbia (UBC). He joined UBC’s faculty in 2001, after holding an NRC Post Doctoral Fellowship and Associate and Full Professorships in Physical Chemistry Department at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. He was also Director of the Materials Science Center at Groningen in 1986-1987, and he remains a Professor of Applied and Solid State Physics for the university.
   
Dr. Sawatzky has won several prestigious awards for his work, including the NWO-Spinoza award from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (1996), the Nieuwsblad van het Noorden prize (1997). He has been a Member of the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences (KNAW) since 1991, and was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2002. Dr. Sawatzky has also served as a member of the Science Advisory Committee of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), the 'Raad van Toezicht' of the Leiden Institute of Chemical Research, the Synchrotron Radiation Facility of the Republic of China (SRRC) Science Technology Advisory Committee, the Advisory Board of the Lorentz Centre at Leiden University, the Advisory Board of the Max Planck Institute for Festkörperforschung, the Dutch Forum for Technology and Science, the Advisory Board of the Dutch Research School of Theoretical Physics, and the Facility advisory committee for Canadian Light Source. He currently holds the Canada Research Chair in Physics and Chemistry of Nano-structured Materials.

Dr. Sawatzky’s research focuses on: the electronic structure of nanostructured strongly correlated materials, such as magnetic materials, high temperature superconductors, and materials for molecular electronics applications; the development and use of various synchrotron-based spectroscopic methods to study such systems; as well as theoretical methods to describe the relationship between the physical properties and the chemical composition, structure and morphology.
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