aghion_schererTwo CIFAR fellows have been named by Thomson Reuters to its 2014 list of “Nobel-class” Citation Laureates. The selection uses data on scientific citations to list the most influential researchers in the fields of chemistry, physics, medicine and economics, and since 2002 has predicted 35 Nobel Prize winners.

Named were CIFAR Senior Fellow Stephen W. Scherer (University of Toronto), in the program in Genetic Networks; and CIFAR Senior Fellow Philippe Aghion (Harvard University), in the program in Institutions, Organizations & Growth.

Scherer was named in medicine for his work with colleagues Charles Lee (Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine) and Michael H. Wigler (Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory) for their research clarifying how specific genetic variations link to disease.

Aghion was named in economic sciences along with his colleague Peter W. Howitt (Brown University) for contributions to Schumpeterian growth theory. Howitt is himself a former CIFAR fellow.

“While we are hopeful that these predictions are accurate, we continue to be very proud of these three researchers and all of our CIFAR fellows and advisors for the enormous impact they are having in answering questions of importance to the world,” says CIFAR President & CEO Alan Bernstein.

Each year Thomson Reuters makes its selection based on analysis of its Web of Science database, which tracks scientific papers and how often they are cited by others.

The actual Nobel Prize winners will be announced beginning Oct. 6.

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