The Conversation: How quantum materials may soon make Star Trek technology reality

by Christopher Wiebe Recommended Quantum Materials 27.10.2017

“If you think technologies from Star Trek seem far-fetched, think again. Many of the devices from the acclaimed television series are slowly becoming a reality. While we may not be teleporting people from starships to a planet’s surface anytime soon, we are getting closer to developing other tools essential for future space travel endeavours.

I am a lifelong Star Trek fan, but I am also a researcher that specializes in creating new magnetic materials. The field of condensed-matter physics encompasses all new solid and liquid phases of matter, and its study has led to nearly every technological advance of the last century, from computers to cellphones to solar cells.”

Read Quantum Materials Fellow Christopher Wiebe‘s full article in the Conversation.

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