CIFAR Senior Fellow Raymond Laflamme was awarded the 2017 CAP-CRM Prize in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics for his ground-breaking work on quantum information.

LaFlamme is the director of CIFAR’s Quantum Information Science program. He is also executive director at the Institute for Quantum Computing at the University of Waterloo, and Canada Research Chair in Quantum Information.

“CIFAR offers our warmest congratulations to Dr. Laflamme. He’s an outstanding researcher and research leader who has led CIFAR’s program in Quantum Information Science with distinction for many years,” says Dr. Alan Bernstein, President & CEO of CIFAR.

In making the award, the Canadian Association of Physicists (CAP) and the Centre de recherches mathématiques (CRM) noted Laflammes “groundbreaking contributions in quantum information.”

They referred specifically to his theoretical and experimental work in quantum error correction, including work with Emmanuel Knill that showed quantum computing systems could be practically useful. Laflamme went on to perform the first experimental demonstrations of quantum error correction. With colleagues, he also developed a blueprint for a quantum information processor using readily available linear optic components rather than exotic non-linear devices.

The annual CAP-CRM Prize in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics was first introduced in 1995 to recognize research excellence in the fields of theoretical and mathematical physics. The medal will be presented at a reception at Queen’s University on June 1.

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