Scientific American | Springtime for AI: The Rise of Deep Learning

by Yoshua Bengio Recommended Learning in Machines & Brains 12.07.2016

Computers generated a great deal of excitement in the 1950s when they began to beat humans at checkers and to prove math theorems. In the 1960s the hope grew that scientists might soon be able to replicate the human brain in hardware and software and that “artificial intelligence” would soon match human performance on any task…

Read the rest of this Scientific American story, written by Yoshua Bengio, program co-director of CIFAR’s Learning in Machines & Brains program, on scientificamerican.com

 

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