Why Dirt and Microbes Could Be Good for Us

Video Humans & the Microbiome 20.09.2017

Although hygiene and antibiotics have improved our health overall, we might have taken our war against germs too far. In this video, CIFAR Humans & the Microbiome Program Co-Director Brett Finlay shares his research with an audience at the Royal Institution in London. Watch to find out why a little dirt and our microbes might be good for all of us, as he discusses in his book, Let Them Eat Dirt, co-authored with Marie-Claire Arrieta.

Watch the audience Q&A 

Related Ideas

Research Brief | Humans & the Microbiome

Antibiotic treatment in infancy can hasten the onset of type-1 diabetes in mice

Exposure to antibiotics disrupts the balance of bacterial communities in the gut microbiome and may spur the onset of type-1...

Video | Humans & the Microbiome

Why Dirt and Microbes Could Be Good for Us

Although hygiene and antibiotics have improved our health overall, we might have taken our war against germs too far. In this...

Symposium Debrief | Humans & the Microbiome

Symposium Brief – The Microbiome in Human Health London

Roundtable Objectives  By bringing together researchers across different areas of expertise, including microbiology and anthropology, CIFAR’s Humans & The Microbiome...

Symposium Debrief | Humans & the Microbiome

Roundtable Brief: The Microbiome in Human Health, Ottawa

On April 5, 2017, Fellows of CIFAR’s program in Humans & the Microbiome held a roundtable discussion with funding partners...

Reach Magazine | Humans & the Microbiome

Our Microbes, Ourselves

CIFAR’s Humans & the Microbiome program is untangling how the life that lives in and on us affects our health,...

News | Humans & the Microbiome

Yeast found in the gut linked to asthma

Yeast has joined the list of gut microbes that play a role in driving diseases like asthma. In a study...