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Luyi Yang

QM_LuyiYang

Appointment

  • CIFAR Azrieli Global Scholar 2016
  • Quantum Materials

Institution

  • University of Toronto
Department of Physics

Country

  • Canada

Education

PhD (Experimental Condensed Matter Physics), University of California, Berkeley
BS (Physics and Mathematics), Tsinghua University

About

Luyi Yang’s lab develops and uses advanced optical spectroscopies to study light-matter interactions in condensed matter physics.

Currently her group is concerned with understanding and controlling electron spin states (in certain special cases, valley states) in low-dimensional semiconductors. Examples include semiconductor quantum wells, quantum dots and two-dimensional (2D) Dirac materials (e.g., graphene and monolayer MoS2). These nanostructures not only provide new platforms to realize novel light-matter coupling, but are also extremely useful for electronics, photonics and potential quantum computing applications. Yang’s recent work directly probed very long spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides such as MoS2 and WS2. A new spin dephasing mechanism was discovered that is unique to these 2D Dirac materials and is not present in conventional III-V or II-VI semiconductors.

Awards

LANL Director’s Postdoctoral Fellowship, 2014

Relevant Publications

Yang, L. et al. "Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in monolayer MoS2 and WS2." Nature Physics 11 (2015): 830–34.

Yang, L. et al. "Spin coherence and dephasing of localized electrons in monolayer MoS2." Nano Letters 15 (2015): 8250–8254.

Yang, L. et al. "Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in monolayer MoS2 and WS2." Nature Comm. 5 (2014).

Yang, L. et al. "Doppler velocimetry of spin propagation in a two-dimensional electron gas." Nature Physics 8 (2012): 153–57.

Yang, L. et al. "Measurement of electron-hole friction in an n-doped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well using optical transient grating spectroscopy." Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 (2011).

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