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Barth Netterfield Astrophysicist

Barth Netterfield’s group is involved in measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and in new measurements of the sub-mm sky. He specializes in balloon-borne astrophysics observation, and has worked with the BOOMERANG, BLAST, and Spider experiments

Awards

Recipient of the Royal Society of Canada Rutherford Memorial Medal, 2009.

NSERC Steacie Fellowship, 2008.

Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, 2001.

Relevant Publications

E. Hivon et al, "MASTER of the Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy Power Spectrum: A Fast Method for Statistical Analysis of Large and Complex Cosmic Microwave Background Data Sets," Astrophys. J., vol. 567, no. 1, pp. 2, 2002.

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Appointment

Senior Fellow Cosmology & Gravity

Institution

University of TorontoDepartment of Physics and Astronomy

Education

PhD (Physics) Princeton University

BS (Physics) Bethel College

Country

Canada

Ideas Related to Barth Netterfield

Video | Cosmology & Gravity

Astrophysics from the Stratosphere

Barth Netterfield, senior fellow in the Cosmology & Gravity program, presents at the Untangling the Cosmos event.

News | Cosmology & Gravity

‘Cosmic dawn’ took place 560 million years after the Big Bang

The Universe forged its first stars 140 million years later than once thought, the Planck satellite has revealed. Data from...

News | Cosmology & Gravity

SPIDER telescope scans the cosmos for Big Bang clues

On Saturday Jan. 17, six telescopes detached from their balloon and landed back on Earth, bearing 16 days’ worth of...

Announcement

New image of the early universe refines theories of dark matter

The Planck Space Telescope has presented a new image of the universe in its infancy, at 380,000 years old. The...

Announcement

BICEP2 results stir debate

Researchers inside and outside of CIFAR are debating recent results which indicate scientists might have detected the signature of the...

Feature | Cosmology & Gravity

The story of the universe

Thirty years ago, when scientists first developed the cosmic theory of inflation, many thought it could not be more than...